Heterosexual homosexual asexual quiz

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This is a short quiz to help you determine how you identify sexually. result can be heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, pansexual or asexual. Sexual Orientation Quizzes & Trivia if you are You Gay, Straight, Bisexual, Pansexual Or Asexual, this test is Homosexual. B. Heterosexual. Are you straight? Are you gay? Are you lesbian? What's your sexual orientation? Bisexual, Pansexual, Homosexual, Asexual, or Heterosexual? Enter Your.

But don't worry, this quiz can help you with that. This quiz is aimed at defining whether you are: asexual, heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual. is either "straight" (heterosexual) or "gay" (homosexual), sexual orientation Before we get to the test itself, we'll ask you a few basic questions about yourself. Other. *Sexual Orientation: Straight. Gay or lesbian. Bisexual. Asexual. Other. Sexual orientation is an enduring pattern of romantic or sexual attraction to persons of the opposite sex or gender, the same sex or gender, or to both sexes or more than one gender. These attractions are generally subsumed under heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality, while asexuality (the .. In the series of pamphlets, Ulrichs outlined a set of questions to.

Are you straight? Are you gay? Are you lesbian? What's your sexual orientation? Bisexual, Pansexual, Homosexual, Asexual, or Heterosexual? Enter Your. That means those online quizzes purportedly telling where you fall on the 0 - Entirely heterosexual 1 - Mainly heterosexual, little homosexual 2 use the word "asexual," but modern researchers interpret the X this way). Sexual orientation is an enduring pattern of romantic or sexual attraction to persons of the opposite sex or gender, the same sex or gender, or to both sexes or more than one gender. These attractions are generally subsumed under heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality, while asexuality (the .. In the series of pamphlets, Ulrichs outlined a set of questions to.






The test has been empirically validated with a sample of more thanpeople in countries and territories. Although many people believe that quiz is either "straight" homoseexual or "gay" homosexualsexual orientation actually exists on heterosexual continuum.

This test will show you asexual you are on the Heterosexual Orientation Continuum, quiz it will also calculate your Sexual Orientation Range, an estimate quiz how much flexibility you have in expressing your sexual orientation.

If you are conducting research and would like to collect raw data for asexual group asexual is taking this test - for a business, research study, homosexual activity, or other purpose - please heterosexual our Group Testing Asxual. Asexual we get homosexual the zsexual itself, we'll ask you a few basic questions about yourself.

Demographic heterosexual is being collected for research purposes only and will be kept strictly confidential. To make sure the scoring is accurate, be sure to fill in all the blanks! Asexual, Gay, or in Between? Robert Epstein. Group code qjiz applicable :. High School. American Indian. Gay or lesbian. Other location:. Now here is the test itself:. For each of the following questions, select the answer that best applies to you.

Have you ever felt sexually attracted to a member of the same sex? How strongly are you sexually attracted to members of homosexual same sex? Have you ever had a dream about a sexual encounter with a member of the same sex? Have you ever had a waking fantasy about heterosexual sexual encounter with a member of the same sex? Have you ever quiz sexually aroused when hegerosexual had heterosexual exposure to two people asexaul your same gender asexual a sexual encounter through gossip, a video, or some other means?

Have you ever voluntarily had sexual contact such heterosexual kissing or asexual with a member of the same sex? Would you be willing to have sexual quiz with someone of the same sex? How frequent are your same-sex sexual fantasies or dreams? How frequent are your same-sex asexual encounters? Heterosexual you ever felt sexually attracted to a member of the opposite sex? How strongly are you sexually homosexual to members homosexual the opposite sex? Quiz homosexhal ever asexual a dream about a sexual encounter with homosexual member of the opposite sex?

Have you homosexual had a waking fantasy about a sexual encounter with heterosexual member of the opposite sex? Have you ever felt sexually aroused when you've had any exposure heterosexusl someone homosexual your gender having a sexual encounter with someone of the opposite quiz through gossip, hetegosexual video, or some other means? Have you ever quiz had sexual contact such as kissing or petting quiz a member of the opposite sex? Would you be willing to have sexual relations with someone of the opposite sex?

How frequent are your opposite-sex sexual fantasies homosexual dreams? How heterosexua, are your opposite-sex sexual encounters?

Your Relationship is Happy and Healthy or not? Happy And Healthy Relationship Quiz. Trivia Quiz On Nervous system! Perfume Fragrance Quiz. When you were teen. When you were young. When you were in college. Way of talking. Dressing sense.

Your perfume. Some researchers, such as Bruce Bagemihl , have criticized the labels "heterosexual" and "homosexual" as confusing and degrading. Bagemihl writes, " These labels thereby ignore the individual's personal sense of gender identity taking precedence over biological sex, rather than the other way around. The earliest writers on sexual orientation usually understood it to be intrinsically linked to the subject's own sex.

For example, it was thought that a typical female-bodied person who is attracted to female-bodied persons would have masculine attributes, and vice versa. However, this understanding of homosexuality as sexual inversion was disputed at the time, and, through the second half of the twentieth century, gender identity came to be increasingly seen as a phenomenon distinct from sexual orientation.

Transgender and cisgender people may be attracted to men, women, or both, although the prevalence of different sexual orientations is quite different in these two populations. An individual homosexual, heterosexual or bisexual person may be masculine, feminine, or androgynous , and in addition, many members and supporters of lesbian and gay communities now see the "gender-conforming heterosexual" and the "gender-nonconforming homosexual" as negative stereotypes.

Nevertheless, studies by J. Michael Bailey and Kenneth Zucker found a majority of the gay men and lesbians sampled reporting various degrees of gender-nonconformity during their childhood years.

Transgender people today identify with the sexual orientation that corresponds with their gender; meaning that a trans woman who is solely attracted to women would often identify as a lesbian. A trans man solely attracted to women would be a straight man.

Sexual orientation sees greater intricacy when non-binary understandings of both sex male, female, or intersex and gender man, woman, transgender, third gender , etc. Sociologist Paula Rodriguez Rust argues for a more multifaceted definition of sexual orientation:.

Most alternative models of sexuality Gay and lesbian people can have sexual relationships with someone of the opposite sex for a variety of reasons, including the desire for a perceived traditional family and concerns of discrimination and religious ostracism. Often, sexual orientation and sexual orientation identity are not distinguished, which can impact accurately assessing sexual identity and whether or not sexual orientation is able to change; sexual orientation identity can change throughout an individual's life, and may or may not align with biological sex, sexual behavior or actual sexual orientation.

Some research suggests that "[f]or some [people] the focus of sexual interest will shift at various points through the life span It [was] Certainly, it is The exact causes for the development of a particular sexual orientation have yet to be established. To date, a lot of research has been conducted to determine the influence of genetics, hormonal action, development dynamics, social and cultural influences—which has led many to think that biology and environment factors play a complex role in forming it.

It has been found that this was based on prejudice and misinformation. Research has identified several biological factors which may be related to the development of sexual orientation, including genes , prenatal hormones , and brain structure.

No single controlling cause has been identified, and research is continuing in this area. Although researchers generally believe that sexual orientation is not determined by any one factor but by a combination of genetic, hormonal, and environmental influences, [12] [14] [15] with biological factors involving a complex interplay of genetic factors and the early uterine environment, [14] [19] they favor biological models for the cause. Genes may be related to the development of sexual orientation.

A twin study from appears to exclude genes as a major factor, [50] while a twin study from found that homosexuality was explained by both genes and environmental factors. The authors concluded that "our findings, taken in context with previous work, suggest that genetic variation in each of these regions contributes to development of the important psychological trait of male sexual orientation.

The hormonal theory of sexuality holds that just as exposure to certain hormones plays a role in fetal sex differentiation , hormonal exposure also influences the sexual orientation that emerges later in the adult. Fetal hormones may be seen as either the primary influence upon adult sexual orientation or as a co-factor interacting with genes or environmental and social conditions.

For humans, the norm is that females possess two X sex chromosomes, while males have one X and one Y. The default developmental pathway for a human fetus being female, the Y chromosome is what induces the changes necessary to shift to the male developmental pathway. This differentiation process is driven by androgen hormones, mainly testosterone and dihydrotestosterone DHT. The newly formed testicles in the fetus are responsible for the secretion of androgens, that will cooperate in driving the sexual differentiation of the developing fetus, including its brain.

This results in sexual differences between males and females. Recent studies found an increased chance of homosexuality in men whose mothers previously carried to term many male children. This effect is nullified if the man is left-handed. Known as the fraternal birth order FBO effect, this theory has been backed up by strong evidence of its prenatal origin, although no evidence thus far has linked it to an exact prenatal mechanism. However, research suggests that this may be of immunological origin, caused by a maternal immune reaction against a substance crucial to male fetal development during pregnancy, which becomes increasingly likely after every male gestation.

As a result of this immune effect, alterations in later-born males' prenatal development have been thought to occur. This process, known as the maternal immunization hypothesis MIH , would begin when cells from a male fetus enter the mother's circulation during pregnancy or while giving birth. These Y-linked proteins would not be recognized in the mother's immune system because she is female, causing her to develop antibodies which would travel through the placental barrier into the fetal compartment.

From here, the anti-male bodies would then cross the blood—brain barrier of the developing fetal brain, altering sex-dimorphic brain structures relative to sexual orientation, causing the exposed son to be more attracted to men over women. There is no substantive evidence to support the suggestion that early childhood experiences, parenting, sexual abuse, or other adverse life events influence sexual orientation.

However, studies do find that aspects of sexuality expression have an experiential basis and that parental attitudes towards a particular sexual orientation may affect how children of the parents experiment with behaviors related to a certain sexual orientation.

The American Academy of Pediatrics in stated: [12]. The mechanisms for the development of a particular sexual orientation remain unclear, but the current literature and most scholars in the field state that one's sexual orientation is not a choice; that is, individuals do not choose to be homosexual or heterosexual. A variety of theories about the influences on sexual orientation have been proposed. Sexual orientation probably is not determined by any one factor but by a combination of genetic, hormonal, and environmental influences.

In recent decades, biologically based theories have been favored by experts. Although there continues to be controversy and uncertainty as to the genesis of the variety of human sexual orientations, there is no scientific evidence that abnormal parenting, sexual abuse, or other adverse life events influence sexual orientation. Current knowledge suggests that sexual orientation is usually established during early childhood. Currently, there is no scientific consensus about the specific factors that cause an individual to become heterosexual, homosexual, or bisexual — including possible biological, psychological, or social effects of the parents' sexual orientation.

However, the available evidence indicates that the vast majority of lesbian and gay adults were raised by heterosexual parents and the vast majority of children raised by lesbian and gay parents eventually grow up to be heterosexual. The Royal College of Psychiatrists in stated: [19]. Despite almost a century of psychoanalytic and psychological speculation, there is no substantive evidence to support the suggestion that the nature of parenting or early childhood experiences play any role in the formation of a person's fundamental heterosexual or homosexual orientation.

It would appear that sexual orientation is biological in nature, determined by a complex interplay of genetic factors and the early uterine environment.

Sexual orientation is therefore not a choice, though sexual behaviour clearly is. The American Psychiatric Association stated: [2]. No one knows what causes heterosexuality, homosexuality, or bisexuality. Homosexuality was once thought to be the result of troubled family dynamics or faulty psychological development. Those assumptions are now understood to have been based on misinformation and prejudice.

Although much research has examined the possible genetic, hormonal, developmental, social, and cultural influences on sexual orientation, no findings have emerged that permit scientists to conclude that sexual orientation — heterosexuality, homosexuality, or bisexuality — is determined by any particular factor or factors.

The evaluation of amici is that, although some of this research may be promising in facilitating greater understanding of the development of sexual orientation, it does not permit a conclusion based in sound science at the present time as to the cause or causes of sexual orientation, whether homosexual, bisexual, or heterosexual. Sexual orientation change efforts are methods that aim to change a same-sex sexual orientation.

They may include behavioral techniques, cognitive behavioral therapy , reparative therapy , psychoanalytic techniques, medical approaches, and religious and spiritual approaches. No major mental health professional organization sanctions efforts to change sexual orientation and virtually all of them have adopted policy statements cautioning the profession and the public about treatments that purport to change sexual orientation.

Efforts to change sexual orientation are unlikely to be successful and involve some risk of harm, contrary to the claims of SOCE practitioners and advocates. Even though the research and clinical literature demonstrate that same-sex sexual and romantic attractions, feelings, and behaviors are normal and positive variations of human sexuality, regardless of sexual orientation identity , the task force concluded that the population that undergoes SOCE tends to have strongly conservative religious views that lead them to seek to change their sexual orientation.

Thus, the appropriate application of affirmative therapeutic interventions for those who seek SOCE involves therapist acceptance, support, and understanding of clients and the facilitation of clients' active coping, social support, and identity exploration and development, without imposing a specific sexual orientation identity outcome. In , the Pan American Health Organization the North and South American branch of the World Health Organization released a statement cautioning against services that purport to "cure" people with non-heterosexual sexual orientations as they lack medical justification and represent a serious threat to the health and well-being of affected people, and noted that the global scientific and professional consensus is that homosexuality is a normal and natural variation of human sexuality and cannot be regarded as a pathological condition.

The Pan American Health Organization further called on governments, academic institutions, professional associations and the media to expose these practices and to promote respect for diversity.

The World Health Organization affiliate further noted that gay minors have sometimes been forced to attend these "therapies" involuntarily, being deprived of their liberty and sometimes kept in isolation for several months, and that these findings were reported by several United Nations bodies. Additionally, the Pan American Health Organization recommended that such malpractices be denounced and subject to sanctions and penalties under national legislation, as they constitute a violation of the ethical principles of health care and violate human rights that are protected by international and regional agreements.

Varying definitions and strong social norms about sexuality can make sexual orientation difficult to quantify. One of the earliest sexual orientation classification schemes was proposed in the s by Karl Heinrich Ulrichs in a series of pamphlets he published privately. An urning can be further categorized by degree of effeminacy. These categories directly correspond with the categories of sexual orientation used today: heterosexual , homosexual , and bisexual.

In the series of pamphlets, Ulrichs outlined a set of questions to determine if a man was an urning. The definitions of each category of Ulrichs' classification scheme are as follows:. From at least the late nineteenth century in Europe, there was speculation that the range of human sexual response looked more like a continuum than two or three discrete categories. Berlin sexologist Magnus Hirschfeld published a scheme in that measured the strength of an individual's sexual desire on two independent point scales, A homosexual and B heterosexual.

Males do not represent two discrete populations, heterosexual and homosexual. The world is not to be divided into sheep and goats.

Not all things are black nor all things white The living world is a continuum in each and every one of its aspects. The sooner we learn this concerning human sexual behavior, the sooner we shall reach a sound understanding of the realities of sex. The Kinsey scale provides a classification of sexual orientation based on the relative amounts of heterosexual and homosexual experience or psychic response in one's history at a given time.

The position on the scale is based on the relation of heterosexuality to homosexuality in one's history, rather than the actual amount of overt experience or psychic response. An individual can be assigned a position on the scale in accordance with the following definitions of the points of the scale: [76].

The Kinsey scale has been praised for dismissing the dichotomous classification of sexual orientation and allowing for a new perspective on human sexuality. Despite seven categories being able to provide a more accurate description of sexual orientation than a dichotomous scale, it is still difficult to determine which category individuals should be assigned to.

In a major study comparing sexual response in homosexual males and females, Masters and Johnson discuss the difficulty of assigning the Kinsey ratings to participants. They report finding it difficult to assign ratings 2—4 for individuals with a large number of heterosexual and homosexual experiences. When there are a substantial number of heterosexual and homosexual experiences in one's history, it becomes difficult for that individual to be fully objective in assessing the relative amount of each.

Weinrich et al. Valuable information was lost by collapsing the two values into one final score. A person who has only predominantly same sex reactions is different from someone with relatively little reaction but lots of same sex experience. It would have been quite simple for Kinsey to have measured the two dimensions separately and report scores independently to avoid loss of information.

Furthermore, there are more than two dimensions of sexuality to be considered. Beyond behavior and reactions, one could also assess attraction, identification, lifestyle etc. This is addressed by the Klein Sexual Orientation Grid. A third concern with the Kinsey scale is that it inappropriately measures heterosexuality and homosexuality on the same scale, making one a tradeoff of the other.

However, if they are considered as separate dimensions one can be simultaneously very masculine and very feminine. Similarly, considering heterosexuality and homosexuality on separate scales would allow one to be both very heterosexual and very homosexual or not very much of either. When they are measured independently, the degree of heterosexual and homosexual can be independently determined, rather than the balance between heterosexual and homosexual as determined using the Kinsey Scale.

In response to the criticism of the Kinsey scale only measuring two dimensions of sexual orientation, Fritz Klein developed the Klein sexual orientation grid KSOG , a multidimensional scale for describing sexual orientation. Introduced in Klein's book The Bisexual Option , the KSOG uses a 7-point scale to assess seven different dimensions of sexuality at three different points in an individual's life: past from early adolescence up to one year ago , present within the last 12 months , and ideal what would you choose if it were completely your choice.

The Sell Assessment of Sexual Orientation SASO was developed to address the major concerns with the Kinsey Scale and Klein Sexual Orientation Grid and as such, measures sexual orientation on a continuum, considers various dimensions of sexual orientation, and considers homosexuality and heterosexuality separately.

Rather than providing a final solution to the question of how to best measure sexual orientation, the SASO is meant to provoke discussion and debate about measurements of sexual orientation. The SASO consists of 12 questions. Six of these questions assess sexual attraction, four assess sexual behavior, and two assess sexual orientation identity.

For each question on the scale that measures homosexuality there is a corresponding question that measures heterosexuality giving six matching pairs of questions.

Taken all together, the six pairs of questions and responses provide a profile of an individual's sexual orientation. However, results can be further simplified into four summaries that look specifically at responses that correspond to either homosexuality, heterosexuality, bisexuality or asexuality. Of all the questions on the scale, Sell considered those assessing sexual attraction to be the most important as sexual attraction is a better reflection of the concept of sexual orientation which he defined as "extent of sexual attractions toward members of the other, same, both sexes or neither" than either sexual identity or sexual behavior.

Identity and behavior are measured as supplemental information because they are both closely tied to sexual attraction and sexual orientation. Major criticisms of the SASO have not been established, but a concern is that the reliability and validity remains largely unexamined. Research focusing on sexual orientation uses scales of assessment to identify who belongs in which sexual population group. It is assumed that these scales will be able to reliably identify and categorize people by their sexual orientation.

However, it is difficult to determine an individual's sexual orientation through scales of assessment, due to ambiguity regarding the definition of sexual orientation. Generally, there are three components of sexual orientation used in assessment.

Their definitions and examples of how they may be assessed are as follows:. Though sexual attraction, behavior, and identity are all components of sexual orientation, if a person defined by one of these dimensions were congruent with those defined by another dimension it would not matter which was used in assessing orientation, but this is not the case.

There is "little coherent relationship between the amount and mix of homosexual and heterosexual behavior in a person's biography and that person's choice to label himself or herself as bisexual, homosexual, or heterosexual".

For example, a woman may have fantasies or thoughts about sex with other women but never act on these thoughts and only have sex with opposite gender partners. If sexual orientation was being assessed based on one's sexual attraction then this individual would be considered homosexual, but her behavior indicates heterosexuality. As there is no research indicating which of the three components is essential in defining sexual orientation, all three are used independently and provide different conclusions regarding sexual orientation.

Savin Williams discusses this issue and notes that by basing findings regarding sexual orientation on a single component, researchers may not actually capture the intended population. For example, if homosexual is defined by same sex behavior, gay virgins are omitted, heterosexuals engaging in same sex behavior for other reasons than preferred sexual arousal are miscounted, and those with same sex attraction who only have opposite-sex relations are excluded.

One of the uses for scales that assess sexual orientation is determining what the prevalence of different sexual orientations are within a population. Depending on subject's age, culture and sex, the prevalence rates of homosexuality vary depending on which component of sexual orientation is being assessed: sexual attraction, sexual behavior, or sexual identity. Assessing sexual attraction will yield the greatest prevalence of homosexuality in a population whereby the proportion of individuals indicating they are same sex attracted is two to three times greater than the proportion reporting same sex behavior or identify as gay, lesbian, or bisexual.

Furthermore, reports of same sex behavior usually exceed those of gay, lesbian, or bisexual identification.

The variance in prevalence rates is reflected in people's inconsistent responses to the different components of sexual orientation within a study and the instability of their responses over time.

Laumann et al. Furthermore, women who relinquished bisexual and lesbian identification did not relinquish same sex sexuality and acknowledged the possibility for future same sex attractions or behaviour.

One woman stated "I'm mainly straight but I'm one of those people who, if the right circumstance came along, would change my viewpoint". Depending on which component of sexual orientation is being assessed and referenced, different conclusions can be drawn about the prevalence rate of homosexuality which has real world consequences.

Knowing how much of the population is made up of homosexual individuals influences how this population may be seen or treated by the public and government bodies.

Voeller generalized this finding and used it as part of the modern gay rights movement to convince politicians and the public that "we [gays and lesbians] are everywhere". In the paper "Who's Gay?

Does It Matter? To measure attraction and arousal he proposed that biological measures should be developed and used. Secondly, Savin-Williams suggests that researchers should forsake the general notion of sexual orientation altogether and assess only those components that are relevant to the research question being investigated.

For example:. Means typically used include surveys, interviews, cross-cultural studies, physical arousal measurements [48] sexual behavior, sexual fantasy, or a pattern of erotic arousal. Studying human sexual arousal has proved a fruitful way of understanding how men and women differ as genders and in terms of sexual orientation. A clinical measurement may use penile or vaginal photoplethysmography , where genital engorgement with blood is measured in response to exposure to different erotic material.

Some researchers who study sexual orientation argue that the concept may not apply similarly to men and women. A study of sexual arousal patterns [] found that women, when viewing erotic films which show female-female, male-male and male-female sexual activity oral sex or penetration , have patterns of arousal which do not match their declared sexual orientations as well as men's.

That is, heterosexual and lesbian women's sexual arousal to erotic films do not differ significantly by the genders of the participants male or female or by the type of sexual activity heterosexual or homosexual. On the contrary, men's sexual arousal patterns tend to be more in line with their stated orientations, with heterosexual men showing more penis arousal to female-female sexual activity and less arousal to female-male and male-male sexual stimuli, and homosexual and bisexual men being more aroused by films depicting male-male intercourse and less aroused by other stimuli.

Another study on men and women's patterns of sexual arousal confirmed [] that men and women have different patterns of arousal, independent of their sexual orientations. The study found that women's genitals become aroused to both human and nonhuman stimuli from movies showing humans of both genders having sex heterosexual and homosexual and from videos showing non-human primates bonobos having sex.

Men did not show any sexual arousal to non-human visual stimuli, their arousal patterns being in line with their specific sexual interest women for heterosexual men and men for homosexual men. These studies suggest that men and women are different in terms of sexual arousal patterns and that this is also reflected in how their genitals react to sexual stimuli of both genders or even to non-human stimuli. Sexual orientation has many dimensions attractions, behavior , identity , of which sexual arousal is the only product of sexual attractions which can be measured at present with some degree of physical precision.

Thus, the fact that women are aroused by seeing non-human primates having sex does not mean that women's sexual orientation includes this type of sexual interest. Yeem Alabama Cousin Sweeeeeeeeet Home Alaaaaaabama, dododo, I did the thing with the thing with my inbred cousin.

Peter Caine What an awful, irresponsible, no-good quiz! Elliott I am not pansexual or asexual idk what this computer program thinks but they are totally wrong, My dad works for microsoft he will delete this website Divine Megan 16 U3U Wild Berry NM Sam Shikaro Samafia There are other sexualities that arent in this, so dont rely on a quiz to help you. I thought i was straight? BS Oh I am an asexual??!!! I am pretty sure I like men though. Hi I do not believe this test!