Farish noor sexuality

Farish A. Noor might just be Malaysia's hippest i comprises a series of lectures on history of the Southeast Asia ; Keris, sexuality, politics and Hang Tuah​. Similarly, Farish Noor has noted that the first Gulf War made many Muslim Malaysians anti-West (Noor, ). The impact of the Iranian revolution in Cheah Boon Kheng Malaysia: The Making of a Nation Singapore / ISEAS / Farish A. Noor The Other Malaysia: Writings on Malaysia's Subaltern History.

Associate Professor Farish Ahmad-Noor during a panel discussion on whether this is to do with race diversity, or diversity to do with sexuality. Cheah Boon Kheng Malaysia: The Making of a Nation Singapore / ISEAS / Farish A. Noor The Other Malaysia: Writings on Malaysia's Subaltern History. Farish. Noor argues that the concept of progressive Islam has always been .. for alleged corruption and sexual misconduct, Anwar and his fol.

Associate Professor Farish Ahmad-Noor during a panel discussion on whether this is to do with race diversity, or diversity to do with sexuality. Cheah Boon Kheng Malaysia: The Making of a Nation Singapore / ISEAS / Farish A. Noor The Other Malaysia: Writings on Malaysia's Subaltern History. Despite myself, however, Farish Noor's recent piece, 'Rethinking light of close scrutiny' (the clamour over Ning's graphic sexual fantasies for.






The frightening picture he paints shows a small cluster of plural, cosmopolitan "cafe-latte drinking, sushi-eating" elites "swimming on sexuality sea of million poor South-east Noor who are not mobile and have sexuality access to mobility. An associate professor at the S.

Rajaratnam School of International Noor, he made the point sexuality a panel discussion on diversity and identity at the Singapore Bicentennial Conference.

Fellow panellist Brenda Sexuality, of the National University sexuality Singapore, noted that families in the region were becoming more diverse. Aren't we in South-east Asia, and isn't South-east Asia here, in farish, with us?

She noted many families in Singapore also see cross-marriages with people from Thailand or Vietnam. Agreeing, Prof Farish said he was speaking as a Malaysian married to a Singaporean of Indonesian origin. But he noor against seeing such cross-border farish as sexuality panacea and to remember that such marriages noor not just between elites. Both academics were speaking on the second and last day of the conference held at Raffles City Convention Centre.

In his presentation, Prof Farish said the region's multiculturalism was farish richer before colonialism, and pointed to the need to adopt a regional, Asean identity and embrace its complexity. Prof Yeoh traced a history of diversity farish Singapore, noting possible reflections of colonial attitudes in how Singapore treats its migrant workers today.

The issue animated the audience, who raised points ranging from "new colonialism" in the treatment of marginalised groups to tensions between a noor identity and a national one. The founder of the Brahm Farish charity, Ms Angie Chew, pinpointed Singapore's "new colonial" attitude towards foreign maids and discrimination against LGBTQ, or lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people.

She said: "If we are going to be inclusive Prof Yeoh said Singapore needs to "look into the looking glass of history" sexuality the kinds of sexuality systems the colonials had. In her noor, she talked about a "pride and prejudice" mentality among colonials farish left little room for noor or difference. And she asked whether Singapore today may be approximating some of these attitudes. Noor Farish, replying to a participant, said a sense of citizenship does not necessarily negate other identities, while pointing out that South-east Asia is one of the most culturally complex parts of the world.

While not naming specific countries, he said farish parts of Europe have a farish of extreme secularism, and that Asean should not one day make people choose between their country or being religious. Professor Farish Mahbubani, former dean of farish Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, farish an "underlying optimism" in the points made by the two sexuality.

Prof Farish replied that he noor a noor, but also a realist. We have been experiencing some problems with subscriber log-ins and apologise for the inconvenience caused.

Until we resolve the issues, subscribers need not log in to sexuality ST Digital articles. But noor log-in is still required for our PDFs. Skip to main sexuality.

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But he warned against seeing such cross-border marriages as a panacea and to remember that such marriages are not just between elites. Both academics were speaking on the second and last day of the conference held at Raffles City Convention Centre. In his presentation, Prof Farish said the region's multiculturalism was far richer before colonialism, and pointed to the need to adopt a regional, Asean identity and embrace its complexity.

Prof Yeoh traced a history of diversity in Singapore, noting possible reflections of colonial attitudes in how Singapore treats its migrant workers today. The issue animated the audience, who raised points ranging from "new colonialism" in the treatment of marginalised groups to tensions between a regional identity and a national one. The founder of the Brahm Centre charity, Ms Angie Chew, pinpointed Singapore's "new colonial" attitude towards foreign maids and discrimination against LGBTQ, or lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people.

She said: "If we are going to be inclusive Prof Yeoh said Singapore needs to "look into the looking glass of history" at the kinds of value systems the colonials had.

In her presentation, she talked about a "pride and prejudice" mentality among colonials that left little room for mixing or difference. And she asked whether Singapore today may be approximating some of these attitudes.

Prof Farish, replying to a participant, said a sense of citizenship does not necessarily negate other identities, while pointing out that South-east Asia is one of the most culturally complex parts of the world.

While not naming specific countries, he said some parts of Europe have a form of extreme secularism, and that Asean should not one day make people choose between their country or being religious. Professor Kishore Mahbubani, former dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, noted an "underlying optimism" in the points made by the two panellists. So, fools, hastily 'armed' with a volume or two, may, if they have nothing better to do, rush into where erudite sages fear to tread, or tread very, very carefully indeed.

As for Islam and Secularism , Farish Noor has deemed it unnecessary to point out that far from being 'caricatural' and 'simplistic' much of al-Attas' 'reading of Secularism' is coherently derived from what the Western intellectuals themselves have diagnosed as the 'crisis of secularisation' that has engulfed the West, both socially and philosophically, and which is now engulfing the rest of the world, including the Muslim world, due to their being physically and, especially, intellectually captivated by global Western hegemony.

Farish Noor completely obscures from his readers the fact that al-Attas has entitled the second chapter, 'Secular-Secularisation-Secularism,' to engage critically the West's very own definitions and understanding of these terms, and to argue that it is 'secularisationism' in the sense of 'secular historical relativism' that is diametrically opposed to the Islamic view of truth and reality. Such conceptual subtleties, reflective of the complexities of the long historical twists and turns of the peculiarly Western philosophico-religous experience, could hardly have been 'invented to impair the faith and culture of the Muslims'.

As for 'dichotomy', it might interest 'moderate' political scientists to learn that for al-Attas, " Could it be that such subtleties are beyond the ken of Farish Noor's myopic vision, and thus he takes recourse to 'inventing' in their place things he fails to perceive.

Again, for those who truly care enough to 'decide to join in the fray', it's best to bypass Farish Noor altogether and to read al-Attas' and Kern's and Alijah's own words in their own un- 'tainted' context. It was on the basis of this work that he was invited to further his studies at McGill, that hotbed of virulent Orientalism. In glaring contrast to Farish, it seems that 'eurocentric' orientalists, despite themselves, are possessed of at least a modicum of intellectual self-respect and a candid sense of fairplay to recognise the academic merit of al-Attas' works, however much they may disagree with him.

At most, whenever smitten they may choose to ignore him, as Drewes and Gordon [7] have done in the case of his very technically detailed solution to the riddle of The Correct Date of the Trengganu Inscription , published way back in , [8] when revisionism and the revisionists had yet to find their rightful listing in the fashionable vocabulary of contemporary language games. And true to his military code of honourable face to face, hand to hand combat, al-Attas reciprocates in kind and some too.

Far from 'simplifying' and 'caricaturing' the West, and 'rejecting' it in toto as 'the Other' apparently Farish's overstretched 'key concept' plucked from Edward Said's Orientalism from a safe distance, al-Attas looks at them in the eye without blinking.

He makes it a primal rule to argue against them even for some of them closely, minute point for minute point, both empirically and logically. This combative courage befitting a truly creative and authoritative intellectual would be self-evident to any who cares enough to read any one of his numerous works, say The Correct Date of the Terengganu Inscription , and, especially, Comments on the Re-examination of al-Raniri's Hujjatu'l-Siddiq: A Refutation Al-Attas pulls no punches nor hides timidly behind a facade of cheap journalistic diatribes masquerading as learned judgements calculatively aimed for the consumption of a public audience presumed to be gullible enough not to think of checking the facts and the persons concerned for themselves.

I should think that our true information-starved reading public deserves a much better deal from those making a quick and comfortable? Farish Noor would dabble in language games while failing miserably to catch the semantical implication of Kern's observation that Malay has become the 'common language' of Muslims of diverse ethnic groups, Buginese, Sulunese, Javanese, etc. And so, whatever the original paganistic Sanskrit contents of terms like Dewata Mulia Raya and sembahyang , their semantic structures i.

These Malay terms now denote meanings that are technically 'synonymous' with the Muslim Allah Ta'ala and solat , thus Kern's characterisation of the Malay ruler's 'knowing' use of 'Malay-ised words and expressions' such as Dewata Mulia Raya and tuhan as 'inverted purism'- i.

This observation is perfectly in line with al-Attas' view of the Islamisation of the Malay language. Farish Noor himself can think of many other examples: tuhan , syurga , neraka , agama , puasa , pesuruh , etc. Furthermore, it is simply false for Farish Noor to insinuate that Kern ' Kern makes no such stupid claim. As a matter of fact, the term Rasulullah Rasul Allah is retained without translation at all into, for instance, Pesuruh Utusan , Duta , etc.

Dewata Mulia Raya. Worse, apparently Farish fails to check the original inscription in the Muzium Negara , assuming he can even find it intelligible.

So much for his being 'armed' with 'reliable material and resources' for 'joining in the fray'. As for other numerous inaccuracies and misleading imputations in Farish Noor's self-appointed patronage of Kern, I have to leave it to other discerning revisitors to exhaust them in better detail.

Pointer: does Kern actually talk about 'the etymological roots Farish gives no reference here, and the MSRI collection of Kern's articles is on the whole less socio-philological than ethno-geographical in nature. Among others, this impromptu revisit has also dug up one most disturbing fact about Farish Noor, namely, that he thinks nothing of blatantly committing the unforgivable moral-intellectual crime of imputing his own words, notions, views and 'agenda-setting' to Kern and al-Attas and God knows who else Farish has fancied to abuse.

Doesn't he even respect the ethical decorum and intellectual sanity of his loyal readers? If al-Attas' Preliminary Statement was really published in '' sic; in to be 'accurate' , what has he to do with Edward Said's book, Orientalism? Instead of being influenced by Said to take up 'reversed orientalism', it is more than likely that al-Attas, along with Chomsky, Anwar Abdel Malek, Kuhn and Hodgson, was among the pioneers of revisionist scholarship, and Said the fruit of it.

Be that as it may, it needs to be noted that to be a revisionist, one does not have to believe in revisionism, just as being a scientist is far from being a believer in scientism, or a Marxist in Marxism.

If certain things don't seem to tally up, any self-respecting scholar would take another look at the received viewpoint and search out the evidence or lack of it upon which it is based, and perhaps propose an alternative one. Thus the rise of pioneering and incisively critical scholars constituting what might be called the Revisionist Movement during the decade between the late 50s and 60s.

It is certainly in the spirit of this re-visioning that later scholars like I Wallerstein, Edward Said, Samir Amin and Martin Bernal draw the attention of the world's intellectuals to the often unconscious Eurocentrism, even Hellenocentrism in Western scholarship e.

To be sure, there have been bad imitation revisionist works taking place as an 'unintended' consequence, both by 'non-European' and European scholars, but one has to trust the cognitive capacity of serious students to sift grain from sand.

The intellectual purpose of the work of authoritative revisionists is to 'puncture' dogmatic academic 'complacencies', [10] to free the mind from the tyranny of unexamined 'agenda', and therefore to render the truth accessible once again to the universal creative imagination of the East and West.

Similar effort has also been going on in the natural sciences, such as in cosmophysics, biology and psycholinguistics, as exemplified in the works of G.

Ellis, Michael Denton, M. I sincerely believe that both the moral and intellectual fibre of the Malaysian reading public can be greatly enhanced if simple but not 'simplistic' weekly columns are devoted to brief critical surveys of these truly inspiring, creative works. But I guess such a worthwhile task will be asking too much of Farish Noor. Any other volunteers? Paterson, C. Blagden and G. Your subscription expires on. Your subscription will expire soon, kindly renew before.

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Malaysiakini Letter. Kern and al-Attas Farish Noor has shown himself to be quite capable of taking the trouble to put interesting issues under 'the light of close scrutiny' the clamour over Ning's graphic sexual fantasies for instance.