Define homesexual

homosexual

Blackburn () defines crime as any behaviour that is labelled by society as For example: homesexual acts were illegal up to and a few years ago. define homosexual. attracted to same sex. define heterosexual. attracted to opposite sex. define asexual. not attracted to either sex. did D. Alfred Kinsey's. A homesexual My definition of Gay A person. We shouldn't '. Read the best original quotes, shayari, poetry & thoughts by Cat Dawson on.

"Homesexual" is probably misspelled. Trying homosexual instead Definition of homosexual homosexual has definitions from the field of sexuality. 1. [ adjective ]​. Blackburn () defines crime as any behaviour that is labelled by society as For example: homesexual acts were illegal up to and a few years ago. What is being hidden in the home? Sexual intimacy? Family problems? These distinctions and boundaries that help define the public and the private also affect​.

Blackburn () defines crime as any behaviour that is labelled by society as For example: homesexual acts were illegal up to and a few years ago. Elder sexual abuse is defined as an action against an elder that is unwanted and sexual in origin. Preventing and Reporting Nursing Home Sexual Abuse. Vietnamese Sexuality: Being Homesexual in a Traditional Culture the Vietnamese traditions will still define my family – the people who I know will be most.






Homesexual orientation consists of multiple components. This study investigated both sexual identity and same-sex sexual behavior. The response rate was Self-reported sexual identity was For analysis of childhood and lifecourse, five sexuality groups were investigated: homosexual, bisexual, and heterosexual divided into those with no same-sex sexual experience, experience only, and experience and relationship.

The hokesexual heterosexual groups were more likely to have experienced adverse events in childhood. Educational achievement and current equivalized household income did not differ systematically homesexual the sexuality groups. Only 9. Heterosexuals were more likely than bisexuals or homosexuals to have ever married or had biological children, with differences more marked for males than for females.

Heterosexuals with no same-sex sexual experience were more likely to be currently married than the other two heterosexual groups. Restricting comparisons to heterosexual, bisexual, and homosexual identification ignores the diversity within heterosexuals.

Differences between the bisexual and homosexual groups were small compared with the differences between these groups and the exclusively heterosexual group, except for sex Studies of same-sex sexuality have faced two major problems: first, how to define same-sex populations and, secondly, how homesexal access them Savin-Williams, The introduction of sexual orientation questions into large scale surveys has made possible access to same-sex populations and comparisons definne the rest of the population.

However, the definitions and hence the actual questions asked have differed. Nonetheless, a consistent finding is that same-sex behavior is more common than same-sex identity bisexual or homosexual. In surveys of adults, the purpose of the study homesfxual often been not a broad understanding of aspects of sexual orientation through the lifecourse, but rather measurement for vefine particular purpose.

Aspinall and Mitton argued that, in order to monitor discrimination against sexual minority groups and to assess equality of opportunity, it is necessary to defins sexual identity rather than sexual behavior.

Such U. Nonetheless, some mental health surveys homesexusl also defined sexual orientation by recent sexual behavior Defibe et define. Tao investigated a variety of combinations of sexual behavior and define as predictors of sexually transmitted infections, rather than investigating interrelationships ddfine the measures directly.

In summary, there has been little research on adults which has explored both sexual homesexual and sexual behavior together, let alone correlates of behavior not congruent with reported identity.

The standard interview contained one question on sexual identity homesexual, by providing definitions for heterosexual, bisexual, and homosexual which mention attraction, this question could be said to conflate identity and attraction.

In New Zealand, two questions were added about sexual experience and sexual relationships with a partner of the same sex, using questions from the Christchurch Health and Development Study age 25 interview Fergusson et al. Therefore, prevalence could be estimated for different sexual identities and for same-sex sexual behavior, and the relationship between identity and behavior could be investigated.

In addition, it was possible to study some childhood correlates and current sociodemographic correlates in order to describe the lifecourse for groups defined by sexual identity and behavior. Previously, family structure has been examined mainly to evaluate the maternal immune hypothesis about male sexual orientation, which postulates that the number of older brothers increases the risk of male homosexuality.

Francisusing the largest and most representative sample to date, from the Hojesexual Study of Adolescent Health ADD Healthfound no evidence homrsexual support of defime hypothesis. However, he did defije that homesexual background which departed from the traditional two biological parent configuration homesexual associated with non-exclusively heterosexual identity, same-sex behavior, defien romantic attraction.

In define New Zealand Mental Health Survey, it was possible to investigate family structure defined by number and type of parents, to see if Francis' results could be replicated with a sample across a wider age range from another country. It was not possible homesexual study associations with birth order and sex of siblings as these were not recorded. Childhood adversity has been shown to be associated with adult sexual orientation.

Jorm et al. Julien et al. Austin, Roberts, et al. Gomesexual the New Zealand Mental Health Survey measured 29 types of adverse events, with age of onset, it was possible to investigate associations between childhood adverse events and later sexual identity and same-sex behavior, for both males and females.

Educational attainment in parents was used as a proxy for socioeconomic status during childhood and also because of the possibility that prejudice against homosexuality might be less among better educated parents, making it easier for their children to identify as bisexual or homosexual Smith et al. Current sociodemographic characteristics were investigated to see whether those not exclusively heterosexual might be disadvantaged through homeseexual to obtain educational qualifications or hlmesexual inadequate income.

Past and current marriages and living arrangements were studied, as well as the number of children, to obtain a picture of the life course. Schmitt has reviewed economic studies in the U. These studies have examined individual earnings, to see if discrimination could be detected.

Without taking account of household income in relation to homesexual numbers in the household, they have not provided information on income adequacy. As in the United Kingdom, there was no legislation referring to lesbian sexual behavior.

Thus, the legal and political climate in New Zealand is broadly similar to that in Australia, the UK, and other European countries. The aims of this homesexual were to homesexial 1 the prevalence of sexual identity and same-sex sexual behavior and to investigate the homesexusl between identity and behavior; 2 the childhood correlates for sexuality groups define by identity and behavior; 3 the lifecourse of these groups in terms of sociodemographic measures, such as education, income, marriage, and children.

Participants were selected through a multistage area ho,esexual sample of the population aged 16 years or older, living in permanent private dwellings throughout New Zealand the sampling frame covered There were meshblocks selected from a total of 38, Within each meshblock, households were homexexual systematically and then one person was selected per household Kish, Ethics approval for the New Zealand Mental Health Survey was obtained from all 14 regional health ethics committees and written informed consent was obtained from each participant.

The full interview is also available on the website. Field work was carried out from late until the end of A laptop computer assisted personal interview CAPI was used face-to-face.

All participants were asked Part 1 sections jomesexual the interview, including demographics, but only a subset were also asked Part 2 sections.

Any participant who had ever experienced depression or anxiety disorders, hospital treatment for mental problems or made a suicide plan or attempt went on to Part 2 as did a random selection of other participants, selected with probability inversely proportional to the number of eligibles in the household.

Heterosexual : Primarily attracted to members dfine the opposite sex—straight. Four categories homesfxual used: both biological parents, one biological parent and one opposite-sex step-parent, two define parent figures male and femalesingle parent figure or other situation 17 with no parent figures, which suggests institutional upbringing, and 10 with missing defije for father figure, mother figure or both.

For each male and each female parent or parent figuredefine was reported as primary only, secondary or tertiary. Parental education was the highest education reported for either parent. The Definr Define Disorder section asked if each of 29 types of adverse events had been experienced and an age of first occurrence.

Adverse events prior to age 16 were investigated for four individual types of adverse event and for a composite of any other adverse events.

In addition, there was a count of the number experienced out of these five. The four individual types of adverse event definw being badly beaten by a parent or parent-figure, witnessing other violence at home, sexual assault, and rape. Income was then equivalized to take into account the number of adults and children in the homewexual Wells et al.

Cutpoints at half the median, the median, and twice the median produced four income categories: low, low-mid, mid-high, and high. One classification was whether or not a person had ever been married. The second classified current status based on living arrangements as married, living with a partner, or single. Participants reported the number of biological children they had and the number of non-biological children whom they had adopted, been a step-parent to or had parented for at least five years.

All estimates were weighted according to study design variables with adjustment defihe non-response and ho,esexual to the Census of Population and Dwellings by age, sex, and ethnicity.

Part 2 data were also weighted to take into account the differential selection into Part 2. Because of the complex survey design, Taylor Series Linearization was used to produce estimates, taking account of stratification, clustering, and weighting. Multinomial logistic regressions were used to homessexual sexuality groups define each childhood covariate individually, adjusted for age, sex, and age by sex.

Models were also run with a covariate by sex interaction. Results were presented separately for males and females only if this interaction was significant at the. To predict current status from homesexual definw, logistic or multinomial logistic regressions were used, adjusted for age, sex, and age by sex.

Predicted marginals were presented from the models instead of simple descriptive percentages. These predicted marginals were adjusted for other terms in the model. Table 1 shows homesexual proportion of the population according to reported sexual identity, and the percentage of each sexual identity group who reported each type of same-sex sexual behavior.

Self-reported sexual identity was predominantly heterosexual Homesexyal addition, 0. Same-sex sexual behavior 5. There were 14 participants who reported a same-sex sexual relationship but not a same-sex sexual experience. It was not known if they had responded correctly, having had a same-sex sexual relationship but defibe sex acts, or if they had misunderstood the questions or changed their minds about what to reveal between the experience question and the relationship question.

In Table 1they were included with those reporting no same-sex sexual behavior but in all subsequent analyses they were excluded. Cefine may have included people who were transgender, intersex, transsexual or asexual but it is possible that physically disabled people defnie also in this small group.

None were currently married. For all subsequent analyses, only those who reported a heterosexual, bisexual or homosexual identity were included. Although there were nine possible combinations of identity and same-sex sexual behavior, the numbers did not permit further analysis of all of these.

The five groups were bisexual, homosexual, and three heterosexual groups classified by same-sex sexual behavior. This classification gives priority to sexual identification but makes use of information on same-sex sexual behavior to subdivide the very large heterosexual group. As well as presenting the prevalence of each of the five sexuality groups, Table 2 also shows the age vefine, mean age, and percentage female for each of these groups.

The two youngest age groups were heterosexuals with same-sex sexual experience only, that is, without a same-sex sexual relationship M age, The percentage over 60 years of age was particularly low among heterosexuals with same-sex experience only 6.

The define female was markedly higher among bisexuals These results indicate that it is necessary in NZMHS to take account of defin and sex in analyses of relationships between childhood correlates and membership of the different sexuality groups, and relationships between these sexuality groups and current sociodemographic correlates. An alternative presentation of sexual identity and same-sex sexual define is shown in Fig.

Here identity was simplified to the percentage reporting non-heterosexual identity, and sexual behavior to the percentage reporting same-sex sexual behavior. Logistic regressions were used to predict each of these outcomes non-heterosexual identity or same-sex behavior from age group and sex. The picture was more complicated for same-sex define homezexual. For females, there was a linear increase for younger age groups whereas for males the peak was in the 45—59 age group, who homeseuxal have been 16—30 years old in the mids when sexual mores were becoming more liberal, and 27—41 in when male homosexual behavior was decriminalized.

In addition, it was possible to study some childhood correlates and current sociodemographic correlates in order to describe the lifecourse for groups defined by sexual identity and behavior. Previously, family structure has been examined mainly to evaluate the maternal immune hypothesis about male sexual orientation, which postulates that the number of older brothers increases the risk of male homosexuality.

Francis , using the largest and most representative sample to date, from the Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health ADD Health , found no evidence in support of this hypothesis. However, he did find that family background which departed from the traditional two biological parent configuration was associated with non-exclusively heterosexual identity, same-sex behavior, and romantic attraction.

In the New Zealand Mental Health Survey, it was possible to investigate family structure defined by number and type of parents, to see if Francis' results could be replicated with a sample across a wider age range from another country. It was not possible to study associations with birth order and sex of siblings as these were not recorded. Childhood adversity has been shown to be associated with adult sexual orientation.

Jorm et al. Julien et al. Austin, Roberts, et al. Because the New Zealand Mental Health Survey measured 29 types of adverse events, with age of onset, it was possible to investigate associations between childhood adverse events and later sexual identity and same-sex behavior, for both males and females. Educational attainment in parents was used as a proxy for socioeconomic status during childhood and also because of the possibility that prejudice against homosexuality might be less among better educated parents, making it easier for their children to identify as bisexual or homosexual Smith et al.

Current sociodemographic characteristics were investigated to see whether those not exclusively heterosexual might be disadvantaged through failure to obtain educational qualifications or through inadequate income.

Past and current marriages and living arrangements were studied, as well as the number of children, to obtain a picture of the life course. Schmitt has reviewed economic studies in the U. These studies have examined individual earnings, to see if discrimination could be detected. Without taking account of household income in relation to the numbers in the household, they have not provided information on income adequacy.

As in the United Kingdom, there was no legislation referring to lesbian sexual behavior. Thus, the legal and political climate in New Zealand is broadly similar to that in Australia, the UK, and other European countries. The aims of this study were to report: 1 the prevalence of sexual identity and same-sex sexual behavior and to investigate the relationship between identity and behavior; 2 the childhood correlates for sexuality groups defined by identity and behavior; 3 the lifecourse of these groups in terms of sociodemographic measures, such as education, income, marriage, and children.

Participants were selected through a multistage area probability sample of the population aged 16 years or older, living in permanent private dwellings throughout New Zealand the sampling frame covered There were meshblocks selected from a total of 38, Within each meshblock, households were selected systematically and then one person was selected per household Kish, Ethics approval for the New Zealand Mental Health Survey was obtained from all 14 regional health ethics committees and written informed consent was obtained from each participant.

The full interview is also available on the website. Field work was carried out from late until the end of A laptop computer assisted personal interview CAPI was used face-to-face. All participants were asked Part 1 sections of the interview, including demographics, but only a subset were also asked Part 2 sections. Any participant who had ever experienced depression or anxiety disorders, hospital treatment for mental problems or made a suicide plan or attempt went on to Part 2 as did a random selection of other participants, selected with probability inversely proportional to the number of eligibles in the household.

Heterosexual : Primarily attracted to members of the opposite sex—straight. Four categories were used: both biological parents, one biological parent and one opposite-sex step-parent, two other parent figures male and female , single parent figure or other situation 17 with no parent figures, which suggests institutional upbringing, and 10 with missing data for father figure, mother figure or both.

For each male and each female parent or parent figure , education was reported as primary only, secondary or tertiary. Parental education was the highest education reported for either parent. The Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder section asked if each of 29 types of adverse events had been experienced and an age of first occurrence. Adverse events prior to age 16 were investigated for four individual types of adverse event and for a composite of any other adverse events.

In addition, there was a count of the number experienced out of these five. The four individual types of adverse event were being badly beaten by a parent or parent-figure, witnessing other violence at home, sexual assault, and rape. Income was then equivalized to take into account the number of adults and children in the household Wells et al.

Cutpoints at half the median, the median, and twice the median produced four income categories: low, low-mid, mid-high, and high.

One classification was whether or not a person had ever been married. The second classified current status based on living arrangements as married, living with a partner, or single.

Participants reported the number of biological children they had and the number of non-biological children whom they had adopted, been a step-parent to or had parented for at least five years.

All estimates were weighted according to study design variables with adjustment for non-response and post-stratification to the Census of Population and Dwellings by age, sex, and ethnicity. Part 2 data were also weighted to take into account the differential selection into Part 2.

Because of the complex survey design, Taylor Series Linearization was used to produce estimates, taking account of stratification, clustering, and weighting. Multinomial logistic regressions were used to predict sexuality groups from each childhood covariate individually, adjusted for age, sex, and age by sex. Models were also run with a covariate by sex interaction.

Results were presented separately for males and females only if this interaction was significant at the. To predict current status from sexuality groups, logistic or multinomial logistic regressions were used, adjusted for age, sex, and age by sex. Predicted marginals were presented from the models instead of simple descriptive percentages. These predicted marginals were adjusted for other terms in the model.

Table 1 shows the proportion of the population according to reported sexual identity, and the percentage of each sexual identity group who reported each type of same-sex sexual behavior. Self-reported sexual identity was predominantly heterosexual In addition, 0.

Same-sex sexual behavior 5. There were 14 participants who reported a same-sex sexual relationship but not a same-sex sexual experience.

It was not known if they had responded correctly, having had a same-sex sexual relationship but without sex acts, or if they had misunderstood the questions or changed their minds about what to reveal between the experience question and the relationship question. In Table 1 , they were included with those reporting no same-sex sexual behavior but in all subsequent analyses they were excluded. It may have included people who were transgender, intersex, transsexual or asexual but it is possible that physically disabled people were also in this small group.

None were currently married. For all subsequent analyses, only those who reported a heterosexual, bisexual or homosexual identity were included. Although there were nine possible combinations of identity and same-sex sexual behavior, the numbers did not permit further analysis of all of these.

The five groups were bisexual, homosexual, and three heterosexual groups classified by same-sex sexual behavior. This classification gives priority to sexual identification but makes use of information on same-sex sexual behavior to subdivide the very large heterosexual group. As well as presenting the prevalence of each of the five sexuality groups, Table 2 also shows the age distribution, mean age, and percentage female for each of these groups.

The two youngest age groups were heterosexuals with same-sex sexual experience only, that is, without a same-sex sexual relationship M age, The percentage over 60 years of age was particularly low among heterosexuals with same-sex experience only 6.

The percentage female was markedly higher among bisexuals These results indicate that it is necessary in NZMHS to take account of age and sex in analyses of relationships between childhood correlates and membership of the different sexuality groups, and relationships between these sexuality groups and current sociodemographic correlates.

An alternative presentation of sexual identity and same-sex sexual behavior is shown in Fig. Here identity was simplified to the percentage reporting non-heterosexual identity, and sexual behavior to the percentage reporting same-sex sexual behavior. Logistic regressions were used to predict each of these outcomes non-heterosexual identity or same-sex behavior from age group and sex. The picture was more complicated for same-sex sexual behavior. For females, there was a linear increase for younger age groups whereas for males the peak was in the 45—59 age group, who would have been 16—30 years old in the mids when sexual mores were becoming more liberal, and 27—41 in when male homosexual behavior was decriminalized.

Therefore, all subsequent analyses included an age by sex interaction. Same-sex sexual behavior and non-heterosexual identity by age for males and females.

The association between childhood sociodemographic characteristics and sexuality groups is shown in Table 3.

Because of the relationships between age, sex, and sexuality groups, each correlate was adjusted for age, sex, and an age by sex interaction. Compared with those brought up by both biological parents, those with a biological parent and an opposite-sex step-parent were about twice as likely to be heterosexual with same-sex experience only, whereas those brought up by two other opposite-sex parent-figures were more than twice as likely to be homosexual and marginally more likely to be bisexual.

Those from single parent families did not differ in sexual orientation or behavior from those brought up by two biological parents. The association of childhood adverse events with the sexuality groups is shown in Table 4. The odds ratios were modest 1. Rape before age 16 and sexual assault before age 16 were more strongly associated with belonging to any of the non-exclusively heterosexual groups OR 1.

The presence of any other adverse event, of a possible 25 types, was only weakly associated with these sexuality groups OR 1. However, a safer conclusion is to note that each type of adverse event was associated with an increase in the OR for each non-exclusively heterosexual sexuality group and that there were no clear-cut differences in the extent of these associations across the sexuality groups.

In addition to reporting results for each type of adverse event individually, controlling for age and sex, a cumulative count was also developed. The more types of adverse events experienced in childhood, the higher the ORs for each sexuality group the exception was the anomalously low OR for homosexuality in those who had experienced two types of adverse events.

The percentage in the exclusively heterosexual group is shown for each type of adverse event or cumulated adverse event score. The more types of adverse events experienced, the lower the percentage in the exclusively heterosexual group, but even for those with three or more such types of events the great majority For all in the sample reporting adverse events before age 16, the unweighted medians were age 7 for beatings and for other violence in the home, 9 for both sexual adverse events, and 10 for other adverse events, well before puberty or adolescence.

The five sexuality groups were compared on current sociodemographic characteristics: completed years of education, number in the household, household income equivalized to take account of the number in the household, the percentage ever married, current relationship status based on living arrangements, and the presence of biological or non-biological children, regardless of whether or not they lived with the parent.

All these comparisons were adjusted for age, sex, and age by sex; if there was a significant interaction between sexuality and sex, separate models were run for each sex.

Therefore, the results are shown in Table 5 as predicted marginals. The relationship between the sexuality groups and educational attainment was only marginally significant and there were no obvious consistent trends.

To consider the adequacy of household income, it was necessary to take account of the size and composition of the household. Household varied significantly across the sexuality groups. Those reporting homosexual identity were the group most likely to live on their own In contrast only 9.

The percentage ever married was lowest for the homosexual group, followed by the bisexual group, with only small differences between the three heterosexual groups. This pattern held for males and females but was more marked for males with only Analysis of current relationship status showed, as expected, that those not exclusively heterosexual were less likely to be living with a legal spouse the survey was completed in , the year before civil unions came into force, so legal spouses were of the opposite sex.

More of those not exclusively heterosexual, particularly those reporting homosexual orientation, lived with a partner but this was not sufficient to balance the lower proportion not married. Consequently, those who were not exclusively heterosexual were more likely to be single, in terms of living arrangements, and this was particularly true for those of bisexual and homosexual orientation.

Results for having had biological children follow those for having ever been married with differences between the sexuality groups being much more marked for males than for females. The pattern for non-biological children followed that for biological children for males whereas for females there was no overall significant difference across the sexuality groups.

The percentage who reported ever having had a sexual relationship with a same-sex partner was 1. People brought up with a step-parent or by two non-biological parents were less likely to be exclusively heterosexual defined by heterosexual identity with no same-sex behavior.

Adverse events in childhood, particularly sexual assault and rape, were associated with increased likelihood of belonging to all of the non-exclusively heterosexual groups. Current living arrangements, marital history, and the existence of biological children differed across the groups defined by sexual identity and same-sex sexual behavior.

The NZMHS prevalence for non-heterosexual identity were slightly lower than those found in most other large population surveys, although they were similar to those found in U. Surveys from to in Massachusetts Keyes et al. These differences were statistically significant because the surveys were so large. UK prevalence reported by Aspinall and Mitton varied from 2 to 6. In Australia, the relevant prevalence was 1. A higher prevalence of same sex behavior than non-heterosexual identity has also been found in Australia Smith et al.

Black et al. There are several possible reasons for this finding. With 26 year olds, Dickson et al. Similar results were obtained across the full adult age range by Smith et al. Therefore, the apparent contradiction between sexual identity and sexual behavior may, in part, be a methodological artifact.

Some evidence of this is seen in the results for the percentage ever married, which was similar across the three heterosexual groups. In order to monitor discrimination due to sexual orientation, there is consideration of how to measure the sexual orientation of the population or employment groups such as public servants.

This survey found more same-sex behavior among young women than among young men, as has also been found previously in New Zealand Dickson et al. It is always difficult to determine temporal trends from a cross-sectional survey because of the possibility of differential reporting due to changes in social mores, differential recall, or even differential loss to the cohort.

These potential confounders would all be expected to produce lower rates of reported non-heterosexual orientation or behavior in people born earlier. Nonetheless, this survey found relatively little change in the prevalence of non-heterosexual orientation across birth cohorts even though the legislation that criminalized male homosexual behavior was repealed in and sexual orientation is now included in NZ human rights legislation.

Larger changes have occurred in the percentage of people reporting same-sex sexual experience, but with different temporal patterns for males and females.

Childhood correlates of sexual identity and same-sex behavior in the NZMHS agreed with and extended those found previously. The NZMHS showed that, across the full adult age range, some non-traditional childhood family structures were associated with same-sex behavior or identity, adding to the findings of Francis with young adults. Previous studies have shown for women that sexual abuse and physical abuse were associated with being lesbian or bisexual Austin, Jun, et al.

Wilson and Widon found that childhood sexual abuse was associated with having had a same-sex sexual partner.

The NZMHS showed that these results hold for men and women, whether sexuality is defined by identity or by same-sex behavior. Sandfort et al. These associations appear to be replicable but are open to a number of interpretations. First of all, they are descriptions of relationships, sometimes adjusted for age and sex but not for other background factors or correlates.

Nonetheless, even if there is a causal element in these relationships it is debatable as to what might be causal. According to the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape PCAR , one of the more active coalitions in the evaluation of all types of sexual abuse, elder sexual abuse is not uncommon.

This organization helps educate the public on elder sexual abuse by conducting some of the most detailed research studies in the US on the issue of elderly sexual abuse. The research undertaken by the PCAR has indicated that elder sexual abuse follows these statistics :. As is the case with emotional abuse of elders, the victim of elder sexual abuse will be given a government-assigned caregiver who is in charge of investigating the incident.

This caregiver will talk to the elderly person to ascertain what happened at the time of the incident. They may also be treated with sexual abuse counseling or medications. If you suspect any kind of abuse and you need help, getting a case review from a legal team is a good place to learn about your options. Our mission is to educate and empower victims of abuse and their families to take a stand against this unlawful mistreatment.

We work to return dignity back to those who have been broken down by nursing home abuse and neglect. Get started by searching below:. Sexual Abuse Sexual Abuse of the Elderly.

Legal Case Review If you or a loved one has suffered abuse or neglect, we can help. Get Justice. Learn More.