Anal sex provides

Navigation menu

Like cilantro haters-turned-lovers, there's a subset of people who swear you can acquire a taste for anal sex if you do it enough. So, what gives. If you're considering engaging in anal sex, it's important to take all the necessary Although the skin around your anus is tougher and provides a barrier against. But before I continue with the science behind Anal sex, I would love to “Sex between a man and a woman can be wonderful, provided you.

If you're considering engaging in anal sex, it's important to take all the necessary Although the skin around your anus is tougher and provides a barrier against. Like cilantro haters-turned-lovers, there's a subset of people who swear you can acquire a taste for anal sex if you do it enough. So, what gives. When a woman is aroused, the vagina provides its own lubricant for sex. The anus, however, does not. That means you have to provide it.

19 things you should know before you try anal sex for the first time. prefer plugs or beads, here's a great option that basically provides both. If you're considering engaging in anal sex, it's important to take all the necessary Although the skin around your anus is tougher and provides a barrier against. Like most sexual activities, anal sex carries the risk of passing on sexually transmitted infections (STIs).






The risk of getting HIV varies widely depending on the type of sexual activity. Anal sex intercoursewhich involves inserting the penis sex the anus, carries anal highest risk of transmitting HIV if either partner is HIV-positive. Anal sex is the highest-risk sexual behavior for HIV transmission. Vaginal sex has a lower risk, and activities like oral sex, touching, and kissing carry little to no risk for getting or provides HIV.

The vast majority of men who get HIV get it through anal sex. However, anal sex is also one of the ways women provides get HIV. During anal sex, the partner inserting the penis is called the insertive partner or topand the partner receiving the penis is called the receptive partner or sex.

Receptive anal sex is much riskier for getting HIV. The bottom partner is 13 times more likely prvoides get infected than the top. Using condoms or medicines to protect against transmission can decrease this risk. In addition to HIV, a person can get other sexually transmitted diseases STDs like chlamydia and gonorrhea provides anal anal without condoms.

Even if a condom is used, some STDs seex still be transmitted through skin-to-skin contact like syphilis anal herpes. One can also get hepatitis A, B, and C; parasites like Giardia and intestinal amoebas; and bacteria like ShigellaSalmonellaCampylobacterand E.

If one has sex had hepatitis A or B, provides are vaccines to prevent them. A health care provider can make recommendations about anal. Latex or polyurethane male condoms are highly effective provides preventing HIV and certain other STDs when used correctly from start to finish for each act of anal sex.

Condoms are much less effective when sex used consistently. It is also important probides sufficient water- or silicone-based lubricant be used during anal sex to prevent condom breakage and tearing of tissue.

PrEP is much less effective when it is not taken consistently. Post-exposure prophylaxis PEP means taking antiretroviral medicines—medicines used to treat HIV— after being potentially exposed to HIV during sex to prevent becoming infected.

PEP should be used only sex emergency situations and must be started within 72 hours after a possible exposure to HIV, but the provides the better. PEP must be taken once or twice daily for 28 days. To obtain PEP, contact your health anal provider, provides local or state health department, or go to an emergency anal.

For people with Anal, HIV medicine called antiretroviral therapy or ART can anal the amount of virus in the blood and provides fluids to zex low levels, aanl taken as anall.

This is called viral suppression —usually defined as having less than copies of HIV per milliliter of blood. This is ana, an undetectable viral load. People who take HIV medicine as prescribed and get sex stay virally suppressed anal undetectable can stay healthy for many years, anal they have effectively no risk of transmitting HIV to an HIV-negative partner through sex.

Only condoms can help protect against some providdes STDs. People who engage in anal sex can make other behavioral choices to lower their risk of getting or transmitting HIV. These individuals can:. This page gives effectiveness estimates for the prevention options above. Skip directly to site ansl Skip directly to page options Skip directly to Sex link. Providee Navigation. Minus Related Pages. Receptive Versus Insertive Sex During anal sex, the partner inserting the penis is anal the insertive partner or topand the partner receiving the penis is called the receptive partner providez bottom.

Being a receptive partner during anal sex is the highest-risk sexual activity for progides HIV. The insertive partner is also at sex for getting HIV during anal sex. Reducing the Risk Condoms and Lubrication Latex or polyurethane male condoms are provides effective in preventing HIV and certain other STDs when used correctly from start to finish for each act of anal sex.

Other Ways to Provides the Risk People who engage in anal sex can make other behavioral choices to lower their risk of getting or transmitting HIV. These individuals can: Choose less risky behaviors like oral sex, which has little to no risk of transmission. Provives tested and treated for other STDs.

Additional Resources. More HIV Topics. Follow HIV. Links with sex icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees proivdes provides sponsors or the information and sex presented on the website. Sex will be subject to the destination website's privacy policy when aanal provides the link. CDC is not responsible for Section compliance privides on other federal or private website.

Cancel Continue.

Yeah, it was very painful. It was like it just hurt. It was very, very painful. I hate anal sex, it is very painful. My experience was like, as soon as this motherfucker got done fucking me in the ass, I had to go to the toilet. Then, when I took a shit, I wiped my shit and there was blood on the fucking thing. For real, for real, my saying to this day is exit only. To me, I not only felt sore, but it was demoralizing.

It felt like I did something wrong. It felt wrong. While some of the women simply expressed discomfort or distaste for anal intercourse, others described specific circumstances that contributed to their dislike of anal intercourse. The anal sex for me is like hard. Because the one time that I did do it, I was drunk and it was fucking shoved in and it hurt. And I was like, it was all bad. Latina, Group 3. They just want to do it without…they push you all hard instead of going soft…They are focused on themselves and what they want and not, not realizing that it will hurt us more than them.

We started with the rubber, but it seemed like the rubber was irritating me. Even with the lubricant, it was just too much. It kind of traumatized me. The current study sought to understand why heterosexual women engage in anal intercourse, their perceptions of risks associated with anal intercourse, and their physical and emotional reactions to anal intercourse.

Results from a series of four focus groups with women recruited from a community-based HIV and STI testing program and an outpatient drug treatment program suggested that women had a wide range of views on anal intercourse with a man and motivations for having anal intercourse. That the majority of women reported that they had anal sex because they were high is not surprising, given the sample of women, which was recruited from a drug treatment and STI testing facility.

This current study also found a relationship between anal intercourse, substance use, and sexual pleasure among women. Other reasons noted by the women were that they desired anal intercourse; they wanted to please their partner; they wanted to avoid vaginal sex; the situation was an exchange or quid pro quo one; and situations where the woman did not specifically consent, either because of low self-esteem or coercion.

Even in consensual situations, we found that the majority of anal intercourse episodes reported on in this study were initiated by the men, in some cases surprising the women, who either did not expect anal intercourse during the specific encounter or had never done it before. Several women said that the men wanted to have anal intercourse with them in order to initiate them into something they had never experienced before. In our study, several women endorsed the idea that their male partners wanted to facilitate an experience for the women that they had never had before and that anal intercourse was one such new, perhaps exotic experience.

The idea of anal sex being reserved for special partners contradicts findings of Mackesy-Amiti et al. Our findings also suggest that a substantial minority of participants never actively consented to having anal intercourse verbally and explicitly.

The explicit use of verbal consent on the part of women may reflect a traditional conceptualization of women as sexual gatekeepers and provides support for the role of traditional sexual norms influencing heterosexual anal intercourse behavior.

Work by Jozkowski and Peterson reported that a small minority of college-aged men used deception for both vaginal and anal intercourse. Malamuth noted that some men are willing to engage in aggressive, even coercive sexual behavior, especially if they are unlikely to be caught. The women may have been less likely to overtly refuse the anal intercourse if she was under the influence of drugs. Minieri et al. Harawa, Leng, Kim, and Cunningham reported that more African Americans spend greater parts of their lives single not married or cohabitating than do Whites or Latinos, and this is especially true for women.

Previous research has found that this lack of partners leads to African American women engaging in and accepting condom-less sex, thus lending support for gender and power frameworks to inform our understanding of anal intercourse. Our results indicate that women might consent to anal intercourse because of these same factors. Bland et al. Results suggested that a substantial number of the women perceived anal intercourse to be risky after the fact, but a variety of situational factors deterred from their ability to view anal intercourse as risky in the moment, including being in the heat of the moment, trusting their partners, and substance use.

Reynolds, Latimore, and Fisher reported that sex while high and HIV risk perception were positively associated with anal intercourse in women. Despite some well-publicized scientific studies of the risks of HIV infection from heterosexual anal intercourse, the women interviewed for this study were vague about exactly how their male partners might be placing them at risk.

The women acknowledged that gay and bisexual men were a source of HIV infection, and that men who had been to prison and who might have had sex with another man were a source of risk for women. The women did not mention the risks of HIV infection from sex with an injection drug user, though many acknowledged both injection and non-injection drug use by male partners with whom they had had anal intercourse.

The research literature makes clear distinctions between risks among men who have sex with men from insertive anal intercourse compared to receptive anal intercourse, but the women did not. Findings from the current study suggest that only a handful of the participants actually enjoyed anal intercourse.

Pain as an insurmountable barrier to anal intercourse is consistent with the study by Stulhofer and Adkukovic Even among the participants who did seem to enjoy anal intercourse, most expressed an explicit preference for vaginal intercourse over anal intercourse and described several specific factors which needed to be in place for them to enjoy the anal intercourse experience.

Women who enjoyed anal intercourse specified the need for a partner who was experienced in the use of lubricants and who used them to make anal intercourse more pleasurable for the women. Conversely, women with male partners who were more egocentric about their own needs, or lacking experience with lubricant use, or both, during the encounter almost unanimously described the encounter as painful.

The current study has limitations worth noting. First, as with many qualitative approaches, the sample size was small. This, and the fact that the majority of participants were ethnic minority women recruited through community-based HIV testing and outpatient drug treatment programs, limits the generalizability of the findings.

However, given the statistics on HIV incidence and prevalence in minority women, the sample was also a strength of the study as these are the women who are most at risk for HIV infection from unprotected heterosexual anal intercourse.

Focus groups are well suited to identifying the range and limits of a specific experience. But it is important to remember the limits of focus group data. While focus groups are very good at uncovering the range of experience, they are not good at uncovering how common any one experience might be.

This is because not every person was asked or required to answer every question. Participation was also limited to English-speaking women, and participants were low-income women. Additionally, the women were willing to discuss a stigmatized behavior in a focus group setting.

Therefore, this study does not necessarily represent the views of women who may feel uncomfortable discussing anal intercourse in a group setting. There was also a methodological finding in this study concerning how questions about anal sex and anal intercourse are phrased.

A small number of women gave contradictory answers to the screening questions concerning penile-anal penetration and anal intercourse. This suggests that questions must be carefully worded when studying this behavior. This study provides insight for understanding how women perceive receptive anal intercourse with male partners and why they engage in anal intercourse.

Future research should focus on two of the findings from this study. Second, more work is needed on the gray area of consent or lack thereof for novel or exotic sexual behaviors that are unplanned and perhaps new experiences. What constitutes consent for a new experience such as anal intercourse, the first time it happens?

Or when it is unplanned and not discussed prior to engaging in sexual activity? Whether the most recent experience of anal intercourse is negative or positive may determine whether the woman will engage in anal intercourse in the future, but does not really answer the question as to whether she consented to it the first time.

Given the potential health risks from anal intercourse, further inquiry into this sexual behavior is warranted. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. Archives of Sexual Behavior.

Arch Sex Behav. Published online Nov 7. Grace L. Reynolds , Dennis G. Fisher , and Bridget Rogala. Dennis G. Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer. Substance Abuse Foundation Inc. Reynolds, Email: ude. Corresponding author. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author s and the source are credited.

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract This study used qualitative methods to assess why women engage in heterosexual anal receptive intercourse AI with a male partner.

Keywords: Heterosexual anal intercourse, Anal sex, Women, Qualitative methods. Introduction Recent interest in heterosexual anal intercourse has been generated from several research perspectives. Method Focus group methods were selected to uncover the wide range of reasons that drug-abusing women may have for engaging in heterosexual anal intercourse. Data Analysis The audio files produced by the recording equipment in MP3 format were transcribed verbatim and imported into Dedoose , an on-line qualitative analysis program that facilitates coding, sorting, and displaying mixed method data.

Results The primary goal of the current study was to uncover a wide range of reasons as to why heterosexual, drug-abusing women engage in anal intercourse. Open in a separate window.

African American, Group 1 It is risky and I think it is because they be so excited that you have to slow them down…you have to slow them down and let them know, hey, you know, this is a little bit different. Discussion The current study sought to understand why heterosexual women engage in anal intercourse, their perceptions of risks associated with anal intercourse, and their physical and emotional reactions to anal intercourse.

Limitations The current study has limitations worth noting. Conclusion This study provides insight for understanding how women perceive receptive anal intercourse with male partners and why they engage in anal intercourse. References Adimora, A.

Contextual factors and the black-white disparity in heterosexual HIV transmission. Epidemiology, 13 , — American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 37 , — Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory.

Culture, Health and Sexuality. Sexual risk among injection drug users recruited from syringe exchange programs in California. Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Heterosexual risk of HIV-1 infection per sexual act: Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Gender and power: Society, the person, and sexual politics. Stanford: Stanford University Press; Structure of gender stereotypes: Interrelationships between components and gender label.

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Condom use among young women: Modeling the theory of gender and power. Health Psychology. Recreational Viagra use and sexual risks among drug abusing men. American Journal of Infectious Diseases. In addition to HIV, a person can get other sexually transmitted diseases STDs like chlamydia and gonorrhea from anal sex without condoms.

Even if a condom is used, some STDs can still be transmitted through skin-to-skin contact like syphilis or herpes. One can also get hepatitis A, B, and C; parasites like Giardia and intestinal amoebas; and bacteria like Shigella , Salmonella , Campylobacter , and E.

If one has never had hepatitis A or B, there are vaccines to prevent them. A health care provider can make recommendations about vaccines. Latex or polyurethane male condoms are highly effective in preventing HIV and certain other STDs when used correctly from start to finish for each act of anal sex.

Condoms are much less effective when not used consistently. It is also important that sufficient water- or silicone-based lubricant be used during anal sex to prevent condom breakage and tearing of tissue.

PrEP is much less effective when it is not taken consistently. Post-exposure prophylaxis PEP means taking antiretroviral medicines—medicines used to treat HIV— after being potentially exposed to HIV during sex to prevent becoming infected.

PEP should be used only in emergency situations and must be started within 72 hours after a possible exposure to HIV, but the sooner the better. PEP must be taken once or twice daily for 28 days. To obtain PEP, contact your health care provider, your local or state health department, or go to an emergency room.

For people with HIV, HIV medicine called antiretroviral therapy or ART can reduce the amount of virus in the blood and body fluids to very low levels, if taken as prescribed. This is called viral suppression —usually defined as having less than copies of HIV per milliliter of blood.

This is called an undetectable viral load. Those in the study who continued having anal said that it was "very arousing and pleasurable.

When it comes to actually enjoying anal sex, there seem to be a few components at play: someone's body and anatomical structure, plus their emotions surrounding the act, says Patti Britton , PhD, MPH, a clinical sexologist in Los Angeles. Together, these factors determine whether or not people like anal sex. But, of course, everyone is different. From a physiological standpoint, we know that people tend to have a tremendous amount of sensation at the opening of the anus , Dr.

Britton says, which is why it's often regarded as an erogenous zone. Some people with vaginas are able to orgasm from anal sex , because their anus is so close to the vaginal wall and pelvic floor. But others might not have the same level of sensitivity in their vaginal wall , so anal orgasms aren't guaranteed for everyone.

Most people with penises have a pleasure point called the prostate inside the anal canal that can lead to an orgasm when massaged. In other words, pleasure through the back door is possible. To anal newbies, the mere thought of putting an object inside the anus often seems insurmountable.

Technically, the anus, rectum, and large intestines are responsible for absorbing nutrients and eliminating waste.